Building capacity for coastal monitoring by local small-scale fishers
  • Acronym: FishGIS
  • Term: October 2017 – March 31, 2020
  • Project Science Team Co-Chairs:
    Mitsutaku Makino (Fisheries Research and Education Agency, Japan)
    Mark Wells (University of Maine, USA)
Background

PICES member countries have significant resources for monitoring environmental conditions and fisheries in coastal waters, while developing nations are far more limited in their capacity for collecting data needed to improve their management practices. Citizen-based monitoring is an approach designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of monitoring efforts when technical and financial resources are not sufficient. There are successful examples of citizen-based monitoring in developed countries, however this approach has not been widely applied yet to the collection of environmental and fisheries data in developing nations.

The extensive use of smart phones in developing countries offers a creative potential for implementing two major project initiatives through a mobile-phone-based GIS monitoring system used by local fishers that could help: (1) to inform fisheries managers on the near real-time spatial catch data and fishing intensity and (2) to monitor useful water quality parameters.

Project organization and funding

At PICES-2017 (Vladivostok, Russia), Governing Council accepted a request from the Government of Japan to undertake a project entitled “Building capacity for coastal monitoring by local small-scale fishers”, to be funded by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) of Japan, through the Fisheries Agency of Japan (JFA). The maximum project lifetime is 3 years: from the starting date of the project in 2017 to March 31, 2020. Funding for Year 1, with ending March 31, 2018, is set at $96,385. The MAFF contribution is from the Official Development Assistance Fund and therefore, involvement of developing countries in project activities is required.

Project principles

The project will be directed by a Project Science Team (PST) co-chaired by Drs. Mitsutaku Makino (Fisheries Research and Education Agency, Japan) and Mark Wells (University of Maine, USA). The PST is responsible for the detailed planning and execution of the project, and annual reporting on scientific progress to MAFF/JFA and to PICES Science Board through the Human Dimension Committee. The report to MAFF/JFA should be submitted within 90 days after the close of each project year ending March 31, and include a summary of the activities carried out in the year, with an evaluation on the progress made, and a workplan for the following year. Within PICES, Science Board takes the responsibility for reporting to Governing Council on the progress and achievements of the project.

The PICES Executive Secretary, or a person designated by the Executive Secretary, is responsible for the management of the fund and annual reporting on its disposition to MAFF/JFA and PICES Finance and Administration Committee. The report to MAFF/JFA should be submitted within 90 days after the close of each project year ending March 31. Within PICES, the Finance and Administration Committee takes the responsibility for reporting to Governing Council on the financial and management aspects of the project.

The project is expected to interact with, and support relevant activities of PICES Scientific Committees on Human Dimension (HD) and Fishery Science (FIS), PICES Technical Committee on Monitoring (MONITOR), and PICES FUTURE (Forecasting and Understanding Trends, Uncertainty and Responses of North Pacific Ecosystems) Program (specifically, Research Theme 3 on “How do human activities affect coastal ecosystems and how are societies affected by changes in these ecosystems?”). All these groups are represented on PST.

Project goal and key questions

The project goal is to enhance the capacity of local small-scale fishers to monitor coastal ecosystems and coastal fisheries in Pacific Rim developing countries.

The project key questions are:

  1. How do global changes in climate and economy affect coastal ecosystems? and
  2. How may enhanced capacity for monitoring activities by local fishers help to improve fisheries management in coastal areas?
The project is proposed to focus on two major initiatives:

  1. Coastal ecosystem monitoring activities by local small-scale fishers to detect ecosystems changes (e.g., deviations in water quality and the changes in community composition);
  2. Coastal fisheries monitoring activities by local small-scale fishers to improve coastal fisheries management (e.g., information about fishing operation or species composition on the market).
These two initiatives will be supported by a capacity building workshop or by a series of workshops, with participation of scientists from PICES member countries.

Meetings and Events
  • First Project Science Team meeting (January 17-19, 2018; Yokohama, Japan)

    The meeting objectives are:
    1. to discuss the overall strategy and general directions for the project and develop timelines for project activities and deliverables,
    2. to review and refine the workplan for Year 1, and
    3. to draft the workplan for Year 2
    Agenda
    Year 1 workplan

  • National Seminar on Marine Tourism and Fourth International Sato-umi Workshop (October 5-6, 2017; Jakarta, Indonesia)
    Report

Products
TBA
TBA
Project Science Team members
Vladimir Kulik
(representative of MONITOR)
(TINRO-Center)
4 Shevchenko Alley
Vladivostok, Primorsky Kray
Russia 690091
E-mail: vladimir.kulik@tinro-center.ru
Joon-Soo Lee
(representative of TCODE)
Korea Oceanographic Data Center
National Institute of Fisheries Science
Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries
216 Gijanghaean-ro, Gijang-eup,
Gijang-gun, Busan,
Korea, R 46083
E-mail: leejoonsoo@korea.kr
Mitsutaku Makino
(representative of HD)
PST Co-Chairman
Fisheries Research and Education Agency
2-12-4 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku
Yokohama, Kanagawa
Japan 236-8648
E-mail: mmakino@affrc.go.jp
Shion Takemura
(representative of SG-MES)
National Research Institute of Fisheries Science
Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency
2-12-4 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku
Yokohama, Kanagawa
Japan 236-8648
E-mail: shiontakemura@affrc.go.jp
Naoki Tojo
(representative of FIS)
Faculty of Fisheries Sciences
Hokkaido University
3-1-1, Minato Cho
Hakodate
Japan 041-8611
E-mail: n.tojo.raven@fish.hokudai.ac.jp
Charles Trick
Department of Biology
Western University
Room 402, North Campus Bldg.
1151 Richmond St. N.
London, ON
Canada N6A 5B7
E-mail: trick@uwo.ca
Mark Wells
PST Co-Chairman
School of Marine Sciences
University of Maine
5741 Libby Hall
Orono, ME
U.S.A. 04469
E-mail: mlwells@maine.edu
Chang-an Xu
Third Institute of Oceanography
State Oceanic Administration
178, Daxue Road, Siming District
Xiamen, Fujian
China, 361005
E-mail: xuchangan@tio.org.cn
Alexander Bychkov
(ex-officio)
PICES Secretariat
9860 West Saanich Road
Sidney, BC
Canada V8L 4B2
E-mail: bychkov@pices.int